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  • Women's Health Services

    Women's Health Services

bladder 2BLADDER DISORDERS

Dysfunction of your bladder mechanisms could mean you leak when you cough or sneeze or that you have frequent uncontrollable urges to empty your bladder. 

Many women know first-hand what is it like to experience incontinence – whether this is during pregnancy, recovering after having your baby or is still affecting you now. The amount of incontinence varies from a few drops to wetting right through your clothes. Any amount can be embarrassing and can stop women enjoying their daily activities such as playing with their children or grandchildren, social activities and exercise or sport because of leaking or fear of leaking. 

Bladder dysfunction often does not fit neatly into one box, you may have a mix of frequency and urgency symptoms, and there is great variability between symptoms.  

Physiotherapy management of your bladder dysfunction may involve retraining the patterns of your bladder including urge suppression strategies, learning correct voiding techniques and may involve strengthening or releasing the muscles among many other modalities. 

BLADDER DYSFUNCTION 

Stress incontinence 

loss of urine related to physical exertion e.g. cough and sneeze or activities of daily living or exercise 

Urgency 

an increased sense of urge in the bladder often at low volumes of filling and related to triggers such as seeing the hall door or the toilet door 

Urge incontinence 

the urgency at low volumes of filling as above but this time not quite making it to the toilet in time 

Frequency 

going to the toilet too often i.e. more than the maximum of eight times in a 24 hour period 

BLADDER DISORDERS

bladder 2BLADDER DISORDERS

Dysfunction of your bladder mechanisms could mean you leak when you cough or sneeze or that you have frequent uncontrollable urges to empty your bladder. 

Many women know first-hand what is it like to experience incontinence – whether this is during pregnancy, recovering after having your baby or is still affecting you now. The amount of incontinence varies from a few drops to wetting right through your clothes. Any amount can be embarrassing and can stop women enjoying their daily activities such as playing with their children or grandchildren, social activities and exercise or sport because of leaking or fear of leaking. 

Bladder dysfunction often does not fit neatly into one box, you may have a mix of frequency and urgency symptoms, and there is great variability between symptoms.  

Physiotherapy management of your bladder dysfunction may involve retraining the patterns of your bladder including urge suppression strategies, learning correct voiding techniques and may involve strengthening or releasing the muscles among many other modalities. 

BLADDER DYSFUNCTION 

Stress incontinence 

loss of urine related to physical exertion e.g. cough and sneeze or activities of daily living or exercise 

Urgency 

an increased sense of urge in the bladder often at low volumes of filling and related to triggers such as seeing the hall door or the toilet door 

Urge incontinence 

the urgency at low volumes of filling as above but this time not quite making it to the toilet in time 

Frequency 

going to the toilet too often i.e. more than the maximum of eight times in a 24 hour period 

BOWEL DISORDERS

bowel 3BOWEL DISORDERS

Whether you have leakage of wind or stool from your bowel, or you have constipation or pain when passing a bowel movement, Physiotherapy may be able to help you restore the balance you need.  

  • Physiotherapy can guide strengthening of your muscles if they are weak and not closing off the back passage, can down-train tight overactive muscles, can improve the mechanics of your voiding pattern or just discuss optimising the consistency of your stool, your gastro-intestinal issues and your diet for comprehensive management of your complaint. 

BOWEL DYSFUNCTION 

Faecal incontinence 

Leakage of stool 

Anal Incontinence 

Inability to control the passage of gas or mucus 

Urgency of stool 

Immediate and urgent need to empty the bowel 

Constipation 

Difficulty emptying the bowels 

Defaecation dysfunction 

Difficultypassingabowelmotion often due to imbalance of the pelvic floor muscles or prolapse 

Rectal Pain 

Can be due topelvic floor muscle tension, fissures and haemorrhoids, or painful rectal spasms. 

 

  

CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN (CPP)

CPPain 2CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN (CPP)

Pelvic pain is an umbrella term that refers to pain in the pelvis, which can have an overwhelming effect on someone emotionally and mentally aside from the physical pain itself.


What is it and what causes it?
Acute and chronic pelvic pain is frequently associated with overactive pelvic floor muscles and the presence of trigger points and tension throughout the pelvis or localised to one spot. It can be secondary to many issues including the trauma of childbirth, surgery, trauma or musculo-skeletal injury to name but a few. It can range from a severe, constant burning pain to intermittent, dull discomfort. It can greatly interfere with daily function such as sitting, moving, having sex or inserting a tampon. 

Treatment options
Addressing chronic pelvic pain firstly involves a thorough assessment of your pelvis, perineum, pelvic floor, abdomen, lumbar spine, and lower limbs.

Techniques which may be used are:
• Manual therapy techniques, for the pelvis, low back or abdomen.
• Trigger point release techniques for the external or internal muscles.
• Connective tissue manipulation.
• Pelvic floor muscle release techniques, learning how to reduce the tone in the pelvic floor, which can be difficult to master.
• Pelvic floor strengthening exercises once any restriction and spasm has been addressed.
• Postural rehabilitation and instruction in motor control or ‘movement’ strategies.
Ultimately the aim is to restore normal balance and function to the muscles and relieve pain.

As mentioned earlier, chronic pelvic pain is a broad umbrella term for many disorders, such as:
• Pudendal Neuralgia / Pudendal neuropathy / Pudendal nerve entrapment
• Vulvodynia
• Vaginismus
• Interstitial Cystitis (IC) / Bladder Pain Syndrome
• Pain post surgery
• Coccydynia
• Dyspareunia – pain with sexual intercourse.

If you suffer from pelvic pain, then it is recommended to see a Women’s Health Physiotherapist who has a special interest in pelvic pain. You may benefit from an examination of your pelvic floor muscles but this will not occur during your first consult or until you feel comfortable to do so.

PELVIC GIRDLE PAIN

pelvic girdle painPELVIC GIRDLE PAIN

While pelvic girdle pain is very common, it should not just be considered normal, and it is not something you should just put up with as Physiotherapy can help.

What actually causes pelvic girdle pain?
The hormone relaxin softens the pelvic ligaments during pregnancy, allowing your pelvic joints to become more mobile in preparation for labour. However, hormonal ligament laxity is not the only factor causing pelvic girdle pain, as not every woman experiences it.

Weakness of the body’s natural support mechanism
Our abdominal, pelvic and hip muscles should be able to stabilise our movements and support our growing baby bump, compensating for the increased joint laxity due to relaxin.
Pain can result when the key muscles that are meant to provide support are weak.
The pattern becomes more complex when other muscle groups work too hard to compensate, meaning they become tight and overactive.
Overall, abnormal stress is placed where the bones of the pelvis connect, leading to the well-known joint irritation and inflammation of pelvic girdle pain.
And it’s not only the connections within the bony ring of the pelvis to consider. Movement needs to be coordinated between your hip joints, pelvic joints and low back joints.

Seek help!
Physiotherapy can help, whether the source of your pain is a structural problem in the bony joints, the soft tissues or the nervous tissue, or if it is just a habit of moving poorly which needs to be retrained.

It is vital to seek help early if you start to feel pain, because it tends to worsen as pregnancy progresses.

Is Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) the same as Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD)?
There is a lot of varying terminology and this can be confusing. Essentially, Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction refers to pain at the connection between your pelvic bones at the front, whereas Pelvic Girdle Pain is a broader term which refers to pain where your tailbone connects to your pelvis at the back and/or at the connection of the pelvic bones at the front.

What are the symptoms?
The presentation can vary greatly. The pain may be one-sided, move from side to side, or it may affect both sides evenly. It may be a general ache or a sharp, stabbing pain. It may present early in your pregnancy or just within the last few days to weeks. You may feel pain in your lower back, symphysis pubis joint, sacroiliac joints, groin, thighs, buttocks and pelvic floor or perineum. It is often worse at night and moving one leg apart from the other is a particularly provocative movement.

If you experience pelvic girdle pain in one pregnancy, it is likely that it may recur with a future pregnancy unless the underlying issues are adequately addressed.

How is it treated?
Your physiotherapist will examine how the muscles of your tummy, back, pelvis and hip are working together in relation to your joints, and will devise a strategy to target any imbalances. This may include manual therapy techniques to release stiff and painful areas, retraining faulty movement patterns, instructing in exercises to provide more support to your pelvis and if required, using the passive support of a sacro-iliac belt.

 

PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE

PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE


Pelvic organ prolapse is where your bladder, bowel or womb descend lower in your pelvis due to lack of support and may protrude through the openings of the pelvis when more severe. The muscular or connective tissue support is weakened or damaged and fails to keep the organs in place. It may not be visible from the outside in the earlier stages but later the bulging of the organs to and through the vaginal (or rectal) openings may become more pronounced.

Types of prolapse:

Proplapse 1















Symptoms of a prolapse

• Heaviness or dragging around the vagina or lower abdomen
• A bulge or lump in the vagina
• Pain or ache near vagina, lower abdomen or back
• Difficulty with tampons
• Changes to your bladder or bowel e.g. straining to pass a bowel motion or difficulty urinating.


Risk factors for prolapse
• Pregnancy
• Vaginal delivery of your baby
• Family history of prolapse
• Aging – there is an increasing risk over 30 years of age
• Heavy lifting or any chronic straining (such as with constipation).
Sometimes, there is no identifiable reason why a prolapse happens in some women.


Treatment
Physiotherapy can be effective in building up the support of the muscular hammock or shelf that the organs rest on.

The aim of treatment is to maximize the action of the muscles, to achieve a better level of comfort and reduce awareness of the prolapse.
You may require a pessary support and there are many options available. Also knowing what exercise is pelvic floor friendly and how to modify what you are doing depending on your individual presentation is extremely important. Following the latest guidelines in terms of exercise prescription in relation to pelvic organ prolapse optimises management.


Can it resolve?
An individualised pelvic floor muscle training program can significantly reduce the symptoms of prolapse, including improvement of bladder, bowel and sexual function and your quality of life.

Once you have a prolapse the symptoms can get worse if you continue with the activities which have caused it. However, you can always improve your symptoms once they occur and may reduce the chance of needing to have surgery.
Prevention is the best, and early intervention is always advised!

MEN'S HEALTH

MEN’S HEALTH

Pelvic Physiotherapy is not just for women, men often need some specialised care too..


PRE AND POST SURGERY
Physiotherapy pre and post prostate cancer surgery
Physiotherapy is often required after Prostatectomy or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). TURP is a surgical procedure that involves cutting away a section of the prostate. After these procedures, physiotherapy may be required to rehabilitate the muscles and nerve input, and to address stress incontinence, urge incontinence, urgency and/or erectile dysfunction.

To manage the symptoms of incontinence and to prevent it from becoming a long term problem, exercising the pelvic floor muscles effectively will help men regain bladder control earlier. Ideally, the exercises are started before surgery, but they can also help bladder control if started after surgery. The pelvic floor muscles are hard to identify inside the body, so expert help will ensure best possible technique and training. It can boost confidence knowing how to do the exercises correctly. It can be a difficult time waiting for surgery and being proactive with pelvic floor exercises can help men cope.


CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN
Male chronic pelvic pain and chronic prostatitis.
Chronic prostatitis (CP) or chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) can have a variable presentation. It can be intermittent or constant in nature, and the pain intensity can range from mild to debilitating.
Dysfunction in the pelvic floor muscles has been linked to the development of chronic pelvic pain in men and Physiotherapy management of the dysfunction is vital to manage the complaint.

MUSCULOSKELETAL ANTENATAL PHYSIOTHERAPY

MUSCULOSKELETAL ANTENATAL PHYSIOTHERAPY

Physiotherapy can help you cope with the many changes to your body that pregnancy brings, be it pain management, issues with mobility or instruction in exercising safely.
 
 

Some of the commonly experienced issues during pregnancy:  

  • Low back, pelvic and rib pain. 
  • Sciatica  
  • Pelvic girdle pain 
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome 
  • Appropriate antenatal exercise prescription and advice
     

BENEFITS OF ANTENTAL PHYSIOTHERAPY 

Improve your body awareness so that you are in tune with your body and growing baby. 

Manage the postural changes caused by the overall weight gain of your growing baby, uterus and breasts.  

Manage the secondary effects of the hormonal changes that can affect the laxity of your ligaments, by providing extra support to your joints.  

Develop a natural corset of support for your back and your baby, and prepare your body for carrying your baby.  

Improve the health of all your body’s systems: circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive and reproductive.  

Master your breathing and relaxation skills, important during pregnancy and the labour itself. 

Changing exercise needs as your pregnancy progressesmay meanyour exercise may need to be adapted depending on what trimester you are in and depending on your individual circumstances.  

Improve your knowledge of how your pelvic floor muscles work and improve your ability to control these muscles, including how to release your pelvic floor muscles for the baby’s delivery and how to strengthen these muscle post-pregnancy. 

 

They call it labour for a reason! 

Overall, antenatal physiotherapy can help you begin to understand your body, learning to work with it through labour, not against it. Your physiotherapist can advise many exercises to encourage the baby to be in the right presentation and there are also exercises to help you be comfortable in many common birthing positions and for your body to be fit and strong to sustain these positions. You will need to be fit to deliver, as labour is what the name suggests – hard work!

POSTNATAL PHYSIOTHERAPY

POSTNATAL PHYSIOTHERAPY

Every woman’s experience of pregnancy and labour is different, as if their recovery afterwards. Women’s Health Physiotherapy is there to guide and manage your recovery of any bladder or bowel control issues, perineal pain or trauma, abdominal muscle separation or one of the multitude of issues which can arise after pregnancy.

Postnatal 3Postnatal Physiotherapy may involve:
• Full back, pelvis & posture assessment
• Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Muscle assessment and management
• Pelvic floor muscle assessment and re-education
• Advice on postnatal exercises & safe return to activity and exercise

Diastasis Rectus Abdominal Muscle (DRAM)
The rectus abdominus (six pack muscle) will divide along its centre line, called the linea alba, stretching to accommodate your baby bump and in response to pregnancy hormones. This separation is called diastasis recti. The divide will normally close again, perhaps not fully, but to within 2cm width after the birth, which is considered normal. Unfortunately, sometimes the divide is wider or deeper than expected – for example if you are having twins, a large baby or with multiple pregnancies. It may not improve even after the birth and can reduce the ability of the abdominal muscles to control the pelvis and spine, with increased risk of a herniation.

Your physiotherapist can guide you in a suitable and safe rehabilitation programme if you are concerned about diastasis recti. There is a wealth of research to show that an active programme of appropriate exercises can help rehabilitate diastasis recti.

Physiotherapy in the postnatal period may help to:
• Prepare your body for the demands of motherhood, such as bending, kneeling and carrying.
• Regain abdominal tone and improve the abdominal divide (diastasis recti) if present.
• Restore pelvic floor muscle control, helping with problems such as stress incontinence.
• Minimise any remaining pelvic girdle pain and restore stability to your joints.
• Offer you some much needed ‘you time’, helping you to destress and focus on what you need.
• Manage your weight, tone up and get back in shape.

bowel 3BOWEL DISORDERS

Whether you have leakage of wind or stool from your bowel, or you have constipation or pain when passing a bowel movement, Physiotherapy may be able to help you restore the balance you need.  

  • Physiotherapy can guide strengthening of your muscles if they are weak and not closing off the back passage, can down-train tight overactive muscles, can improve the mechanics of your voiding pattern or just discuss optimising the consistency of your stool, your gastro-intestinal issues and your diet for comprehensive management of your complaint. 

BOWEL DYSFUNCTION 

Faecal incontinence 

Leakage of stool 

Anal Incontinence 

Inability to control the passage of gas or mucus 

Urgency of stool 

Immediate and urgent need to empty the bowel 

Constipation 

Difficulty emptying the bowels 

Defaecation dysfunction 

Difficultypassingabowelmotion often due to imbalance of the pelvic floor muscles or prolapse 

Rectal Pain 

Can be due topelvic floor muscle tension, fissures and haemorrhoids, or painful rectal spasms. 

 

  

CPPain 2CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN (CPP)

Pelvic pain is an umbrella term that refers to pain in the pelvis, which can have an overwhelming effect on someone emotionally and mentally aside from the physical pain itself.


What is it and what causes it?
Acute and chronic pelvic pain is frequently associated with overactive pelvic floor muscles and the presence of trigger points and tension throughout the pelvis or localised to one spot. It can be secondary to many issues including the trauma of childbirth, surgery, trauma or musculo-skeletal injury to name but a few. It can range from a severe, constant burning pain to intermittent, dull discomfort. It can greatly interfere with daily function such as sitting, moving, having sex or inserting a tampon. 

Treatment options
Addressing chronic pelvic pain firstly involves a thorough assessment of your pelvis, perineum, pelvic floor, abdomen, lumbar spine, and lower limbs.

Techniques which may be used are:
• Manual therapy techniques, for the pelvis, low back or abdomen.
• Trigger point release techniques for the external or internal muscles.
• Connective tissue manipulation.
• Pelvic floor muscle release techniques, learning how to reduce the tone in the pelvic floor, which can be difficult to master.
• Pelvic floor strengthening exercises once any restriction and spasm has been addressed.
• Postural rehabilitation and instruction in motor control or ‘movement’ strategies.
Ultimately the aim is to restore normal balance and function to the muscles and relieve pain.

As mentioned earlier, chronic pelvic pain is a broad umbrella term for many disorders, such as:
• Pudendal Neuralgia / Pudendal neuropathy / Pudendal nerve entrapment
• Vulvodynia
• Vaginismus
• Interstitial Cystitis (IC) / Bladder Pain Syndrome
• Pain post surgery
• Coccydynia
• Dyspareunia – pain with sexual intercourse.

If you suffer from pelvic pain, then it is recommended to see a Women’s Health Physiotherapist who has a special interest in pelvic pain. You may benefit from an examination of your pelvic floor muscles but this will not occur during your first consult or until you feel comfortable to do so.

pelvic girdle painPELVIC GIRDLE PAIN

While pelvic girdle pain is very common, it should not just be considered normal, and it is not something you should just put up with as Physiotherapy can help.

What actually causes pelvic girdle pain?
The hormone relaxin softens the pelvic ligaments during pregnancy, allowing your pelvic joints to become more mobile in preparation for labour. However, hormonal ligament laxity is not the only factor causing pelvic girdle pain, as not every woman experiences it.

Weakness of the body’s natural support mechanism
Our abdominal, pelvic and hip muscles should be able to stabilise our movements and support our growing baby bump, compensating for the increased joint laxity due to relaxin.
Pain can result when the key muscles that are meant to provide support are weak.
The pattern becomes more complex when other muscle groups work too hard to compensate, meaning they become tight and overactive.
Overall, abnormal stress is placed where the bones of the pelvis connect, leading to the well-known joint irritation and inflammation of pelvic girdle pain.
And it’s not only the connections within the bony ring of the pelvis to consider. Movement needs to be coordinated between your hip joints, pelvic joints and low back joints.

Seek help!
Physiotherapy can help, whether the source of your pain is a structural problem in the bony joints, the soft tissues or the nervous tissue, or if it is just a habit of moving poorly which needs to be retrained.

It is vital to seek help early if you start to feel pain, because it tends to worsen as pregnancy progresses.

Is Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) the same as Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction (SPD)?
There is a lot of varying terminology and this can be confusing. Essentially, Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction refers to pain at the connection between your pelvic bones at the front, whereas Pelvic Girdle Pain is a broader term which refers to pain where your tailbone connects to your pelvis at the back and/or at the connection of the pelvic bones at the front.

What are the symptoms?
The presentation can vary greatly. The pain may be one-sided, move from side to side, or it may affect both sides evenly. It may be a general ache or a sharp, stabbing pain. It may present early in your pregnancy or just within the last few days to weeks. You may feel pain in your lower back, symphysis pubis joint, sacroiliac joints, groin, thighs, buttocks and pelvic floor or perineum. It is often worse at night and moving one leg apart from the other is a particularly provocative movement.

If you experience pelvic girdle pain in one pregnancy, it is likely that it may recur with a future pregnancy unless the underlying issues are adequately addressed.

How is it treated?
Your physiotherapist will examine how the muscles of your tummy, back, pelvis and hip are working together in relation to your joints, and will devise a strategy to target any imbalances. This may include manual therapy techniques to release stiff and painful areas, retraining faulty movement patterns, instructing in exercises to provide more support to your pelvis and if required, using the passive support of a sacro-iliac belt.

 

PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE


Pelvic organ prolapse is where your bladder, bowel or womb descend lower in your pelvis due to lack of support and may protrude through the openings of the pelvis when more severe. The muscular or connective tissue support is weakened or damaged and fails to keep the organs in place. It may not be visible from the outside in the earlier stages but later the bulging of the organs to and through the vaginal (or rectal) openings may become more pronounced.

Types of prolapse:

Proplapse 1















Symptoms of a prolapse

• Heaviness or dragging around the vagina or lower abdomen
• A bulge or lump in the vagina
• Pain or ache near vagina, lower abdomen or back
• Difficulty with tampons
• Changes to your bladder or bowel e.g. straining to pass a bowel motion or difficulty urinating.


Risk factors for prolapse
• Pregnancy
• Vaginal delivery of your baby
• Family history of prolapse
• Aging – there is an increasing risk over 30 years of age
• Heavy lifting or any chronic straining (such as with constipation).
Sometimes, there is no identifiable reason why a prolapse happens in some women.


Treatment
Physiotherapy can be effective in building up the support of the muscular hammock or shelf that the organs rest on.

The aim of treatment is to maximize the action of the muscles, to achieve a better level of comfort and reduce awareness of the prolapse.
You may require a pessary support and there are many options available. Also knowing what exercise is pelvic floor friendly and how to modify what you are doing depending on your individual presentation is extremely important. Following the latest guidelines in terms of exercise prescription in relation to pelvic organ prolapse optimises management.


Can it resolve?
An individualised pelvic floor muscle training program can significantly reduce the symptoms of prolapse, including improvement of bladder, bowel and sexual function and your quality of life.

Once you have a prolapse the symptoms can get worse if you continue with the activities which have caused it. However, you can always improve your symptoms once they occur and may reduce the chance of needing to have surgery.
Prevention is the best, and early intervention is always advised!

MEN’S HEALTH

Pelvic Physiotherapy is not just for women, men often need some specialised care too..


PRE AND POST SURGERY
Physiotherapy pre and post prostate cancer surgery
Physiotherapy is often required after Prostatectomy or transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). TURP is a surgical procedure that involves cutting away a section of the prostate. After these procedures, physiotherapy may be required to rehabilitate the muscles and nerve input, and to address stress incontinence, urge incontinence, urgency and/or erectile dysfunction.

To manage the symptoms of incontinence and to prevent it from becoming a long term problem, exercising the pelvic floor muscles effectively will help men regain bladder control earlier. Ideally, the exercises are started before surgery, but they can also help bladder control if started after surgery. The pelvic floor muscles are hard to identify inside the body, so expert help will ensure best possible technique and training. It can boost confidence knowing how to do the exercises correctly. It can be a difficult time waiting for surgery and being proactive with pelvic floor exercises can help men cope.


CHRONIC PELVIC PAIN
Male chronic pelvic pain and chronic prostatitis.
Chronic prostatitis (CP) or chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) can have a variable presentation. It can be intermittent or constant in nature, and the pain intensity can range from mild to debilitating.
Dysfunction in the pelvic floor muscles has been linked to the development of chronic pelvic pain in men and Physiotherapy management of the dysfunction is vital to manage the complaint.

MUSCULOSKELETAL ANTENATAL PHYSIOTHERAPY

Physiotherapy can help you cope with the many changes to your body that pregnancy brings, be it pain management, issues with mobility or instruction in exercising safely.
 
 

Some of the commonly experienced issues during pregnancy:  

  • Low back, pelvic and rib pain. 
  • Sciatica  
  • Pelvic girdle pain 
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome 
  • Appropriate antenatal exercise prescription and advice
     

BENEFITS OF ANTENTAL PHYSIOTHERAPY 

Improve your body awareness so that you are in tune with your body and growing baby. 

Manage the postural changes caused by the overall weight gain of your growing baby, uterus and breasts.  

Manage the secondary effects of the hormonal changes that can affect the laxity of your ligaments, by providing extra support to your joints.  

Develop a natural corset of support for your back and your baby, and prepare your body for carrying your baby.  

Improve the health of all your body’s systems: circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive and reproductive.  

Master your breathing and relaxation skills, important during pregnancy and the labour itself. 

Changing exercise needs as your pregnancy progressesmay meanyour exercise may need to be adapted depending on what trimester you are in and depending on your individual circumstances.  

Improve your knowledge of how your pelvic floor muscles work and improve your ability to control these muscles, including how to release your pelvic floor muscles for the baby’s delivery and how to strengthen these muscle post-pregnancy. 

 

They call it labour for a reason! 

Overall, antenatal physiotherapy can help you begin to understand your body, learning to work with it through labour, not against it. Your physiotherapist can advise many exercises to encourage the baby to be in the right presentation and there are also exercises to help you be comfortable in many common birthing positions and for your body to be fit and strong to sustain these positions. You will need to be fit to deliver, as labour is what the name suggests – hard work!

POSTNATAL PHYSIOTHERAPY

Every woman’s experience of pregnancy and labour is different, as if their recovery afterwards. Women’s Health Physiotherapy is there to guide and manage your recovery of any bladder or bowel control issues, perineal pain or trauma, abdominal muscle separation or one of the multitude of issues which can arise after pregnancy.

Postnatal 3Postnatal Physiotherapy may involve:
• Full back, pelvis & posture assessment
• Diastasis Rectus Abdominus Muscle assessment and management
• Pelvic floor muscle assessment and re-education
• Advice on postnatal exercises & safe return to activity and exercise

Diastasis Rectus Abdominal Muscle (DRAM)
The rectus abdominus (six pack muscle) will divide along its centre line, called the linea alba, stretching to accommodate your baby bump and in response to pregnancy hormones. This separation is called diastasis recti. The divide will normally close again, perhaps not fully, but to within 2cm width after the birth, which is considered normal. Unfortunately, sometimes the divide is wider or deeper than expected – for example if you are having twins, a large baby or with multiple pregnancies. It may not improve even after the birth and can reduce the ability of the abdominal muscles to control the pelvis and spine, with increased risk of a herniation.

Your physiotherapist can guide you in a suitable and safe rehabilitation programme if you are concerned about diastasis recti. There is a wealth of research to show that an active programme of appropriate exercises can help rehabilitate diastasis recti.

Physiotherapy in the postnatal period may help to:
• Prepare your body for the demands of motherhood, such as bending, kneeling and carrying.
• Regain abdominal tone and improve the abdominal divide (diastasis recti) if present.
• Restore pelvic floor muscle control, helping with problems such as stress incontinence.
• Minimise any remaining pelvic girdle pain and restore stability to your joints.
• Offer you some much needed ‘you time’, helping you to destress and focus on what you need.
• Manage your weight, tone up and get back in shape.

LOCATION


8G O'Boyce's Corner

Port Road
Letterkenny
County Donegal
Ireland

CONTACT


Telephone:
+353 74 91 61453


Send us an eMail >>



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